Why You Should Visit Scandinavia in Summer

The view of colorful buildings next to the river where there are several boats.

Scandinavia consists of three countries: Norway, Denmark, and Sweden. As these countries are located in the north, it is natural that the colder months can be pretty harsh. But in the summer and early fall, the weather is enjoyable, allowing you to create fantastic memories. Here are some reasons to visit Scandinavia in summer, as well as our suggestions for the places you shouldn’t miss there.

Midsummer Eve celebrations

On June 23rd, people around Scandinavia celebrate Midsummer Eve. This is the longest day of the year, and the presence of daylight is very important in the northern regions. The reason is that a human being experiences various discomforts when there is a continuous lack of sunlight. Therefore, the summer solstice is highly appreciated and celebrated. In all parts of Scandinavia, people light bonfires and organize various parties on this day.

In Darlana, Sweden, you will experience a traditional Midsummer celebration like nowhere else

For the most traditional celebration of Midsummer, you should go to Darlana. In the past, women and girls put flowers in their hair and danced around a decorated pole. Because the custom lived on, you will get a chance to do the same during Darlana on June 23rd. On the big day, everything runs according to the schedule. The day before, women gather flowers they will use to decorate the maypole and their hair. In the morning, everyone meets for the decorating. And after that comes a traditional lunch that includes herrings, baked salmon, and moose, among other customary dishes. As for the drinks, there is beer and local spiced vodka. After lunch, the maypole is raised, and the dancing, fun, and games begin. This is immensely fun for everyone involved, as anyone present gets to be involved, making it one experience you will never forget.

Visit Scandinavia in summer to explore the fjords of Norway

The coast of Norway is one of the most remarkable works of art that nature has blessed us with. Approximately 1200 fjords along its west coast offer an excellent array of outdoor activities. This area is among those you should visit in Scandinavia in summer because the weather is optimal for everything this part of the world has to offer. The first reason to go there is to enjoy the breathtaking beauty of the waterways, cliffs, villages, and towns. Something like that is extremely rare. If you are one of those travelers who prefer to be on the move, visiting the fjords is ideal for you. There, you can ride a bike, hike on one of the most amazing trails that ever existed, or simply spend some time kayaking in this surreal environment. 

An aerial view of one of the fjords.
The fjords of Norway are enchanting, and if you visit Scandinavia in summer, you will enjoy their full potential.

Roskilde Festival in Denmark is a perfect place for music events enthusiasts

In 1971, two high school students and a friend came up with an idea to organize a music festival. The idea was great, but it required lots of labor, so the non-profit Roskilde Foundation took over and is running it to this day. Apart from being one of the biggest music festivals in Europe, it is also one of the biggest fundraising events. With most of the work done by volunteers, all the profits go to charity organizations. The foundation allows the festival participants to decide which organization should receive the funds raised by the festival. So, this festival has immense entertainment value and supports humanitarian organizations, making it extremely special among its kind. No Festivalgoer should miss it. 

Visit the capitals of Scandinavian countries without wearing heavy winter clothes

There is no doubt that these (as any other) cities are just as enchanting when draped in snow. But the truth is, you will be able to stay outside longer in warmer weather and be more comfortable without having to wear multi-layered winter clothes. Here’s what to do in each of the three unique capital cities when you visit Scandinavia in summer:

Oslo. In Oslo, you will adore the boat trip around the Oslofjord. Or, if you prefer to break some sweat, you can kayak your way around the fjord. There’s a walking tour, AKA the hipster walking tour you will love. Alternatively, you can be part of the barefoot tradition taking place in the parks.

Copenhagen. Take pictures! This city has a great way of making everyone’s photographs look surreal. Of course, there is plenty to do in this city, ranging from bike riding, a tradition here, to enjoying swimming in the perfectly clean old industrial harbor.

Stockholm. This city offers an impressive archipelago for you to explore. Also, there’s a fantastic open-air museum of Sweden’s history. And when there, do not miss the chance to witness the Change of Royal Guards, an exciting traditional event.

There are so many things to do in these cities and never to get bored. If you are feeling adventurous, hop on the first plane there. If you prefer to leave your items safe and are wondering whether you will be able to pack for storage on short notice, fret not, it is doable, and it will be worth it.

A picture of a woman’s profile while standing on the bridge with lots of padlocks.
After visiting Copenhagen, you will have some amazing photographs.

Let the beaches of Norway mesmerize you in the summer

Some of us love enjoying the paradise beaches but want to avoid the heat. Well, the beaches of Norway are the solution. Many beaches in this fantastic northern country will stun you with their beauty, yet sitting on them in summer is quite pleasant. The temperatures are spring-like; you might even need a sweater on some days in June or September. What is characteristic about these beaches is that one experiences them in a completely different way than is the case with regular, hot weather beaches.

For example, you can visit the beaches in Jæren and enjoy the soul-soothing walk that goes on and on since there are kilometers of it. Some secluded beaches in Northern Norway will make you wonder whether you have somehow ended up in the Maldives. Trøndelag is where you will find one of the finest beach bars if that is more of your cup of tea. Some of the beaches offer you cutting the waves on horseback. If you happen to be taking the soul-searching trip on your own, consider these unusual beaches because what you will find there might be exactly what you are looking for.

A view of the beach with white sand and turquoise water.
Visit Scandinavia in summer to see some truly unique white-sand beaches.

Final thoughts

As you can see, these northern countries are fantastic any time of the year. You should visit Scandinavia in summer to enjoy it to the fullest with the weather on your side. And early fall is also a good time to visit. Just don’t forget to bring enough storage space in your device for the photos because you will need it.

Guide to Great Etiquette on the Mountain

This Post Was Originally Published on the Liftopia Blog on March 14, 2019 by Mark Crone

If you are a skier or boarder, any day and every day on the hill is a good day. What’s not so fun is bad ski etiquette and forgetting the “golden rules” of skiing. It’s mostly common sense mixed with respect for others.

As a ski patroller, I see it all. Here’s a list of things not to do this ski season:

Forget Lift Etiquette

Cutting in line or holding up the queue because you want to avoid sharing a chair with someone will result in scornful looks or worse. Don’t stand on the skis and snowboards of others in the line. If there’s a wait for the quad chair, get in 4s. The line moves quicker, and you get up the lift quicker. If you’ve missed your friend, wait off to the side or at the top of the lift.

Wave Your Poles Around

Just don’t do it. Keep your poles to yourself on the slope and in the lift line. There’s nothing fun about getting whacked, poked or your equipment scratched by the end of a ski pole in the lift line.

Ski or Snowboard Drunk (or High)

Wait until après ski for the party favors. Skiing after drinking can be dangerous to you and the people around you. A serious mountain and steep runs require serious effort and should be a “high” all on its own.

Drop Stuff (Or Litter)

Some folks will eat energy bars, candy, or drink water on the chairlift ride. Put the wrapper in your pocket until you get to a trash can – and don’t drop your phone, gloves, poles, skis, and board when you are riding up the chair. Skiers under the chair will thank you. There are typically trash cans at the top of a lift or at the lift line.

Get Out of Control

Keep working on improving but do it gradually and within reason. Bunny slope to Black Diamond in one day is not realistic (or safe). Don’t go faster or steeper than you can handle. Travel at the speed you are comfortable with and where you can control your turns and make a quick stop if necessary.

Ski Past A Man/Woman Down

Every skier has a ‘yard sale’ at some point (a wipe out across the hill that leaves skis, poles, hats, goggles, and dentures scattered everywhere). If you come across a yard sale, or worse, stop and ask if the downed skier is ok and/or if they need help. You can help collect their belongings or call for the Ski Patrol if they are injured.

OK – back to the fun. It’s all about having a great day outdoors and enjoying yourself. Common sense and good manners go a long way on the slopes. Stay safe, respect others, and have a good time.

How to Avoid Common Mistakes On The Mountain

A great day of skiing
Photo by Melvin Wahlin on Pexels.com

As a ski patroller and veteran skier, I’ve seen more than my share of mistakes on the mountain. And there is a theme with common mistakes – not being prepared and/or not skiing smart. Here’s how to avoid those common mistakes on the mountain:

1. Be prepared for a Workout

Skiing and snowboarding are great workouts. A day on the slopes requires stamina, a strong core and leg muscles. If you plan on hitting a big mountain with long runs, skiing will be harder still. If you have a decent fitness level, you’ll have a good base for your day on the slopes and adjust easier to the demands of skiing and boarding. A regular fitness routine will help you to ski or snowboard better and longer.

2. Avoid heading straight to the Black Diamonds

A skier on a black diamond run
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Start out easy at the beginning of the day. Experienced skiers always take it easy for, at least, the first few runs before heading off to the diamond runs. Warm up and get your focus on movement, turns and technique before you crank it up on more challenging stuff. Gain confidence with easier runs before moving to diamond runs. Work your way up to the more serious, advanced, narrow, thrill rides.

3. Use common sense

There is something called the Alpine Responsibility Code which many skiers know, and many don’t. It’s typically posted on a yellow sign at the bottom of most lifts. It’s a combination of safety rules and common sense for skiers and snowboarders. For example, always stay in control; do not stop where you obstruct a trail, before starting downhill or merging onto a trail, look uphill and yield to others, etc. Follow these rules (ski smart) and you’ll stay safe and avoid the common mistakes of others.

4. Pay attention to lifts

Walking back to the chalet after a great day of snowboarding
Photo by Visit Almaty on Pexels.com

Getting on and off lifts is prime for accidents. If you don’t pay attention, you’ll quickly find that the chairlift is unforgiving. High speed chairs pick you up slowly, but then move fast. Be ready, line up with skis pointed forward and poles in hand. Getting off a chairlift can be a challenge for novice skiers and boarders. At the offloading area, simply stand up and let the chair push you. T-bars or other vintage lifts are completely unknown to new or young skiers, so ask for help from the lift operator or ski patrol if you need it.

5. Don’t think you can ski all day (with no break)

If you only ski while on a ski vacation, you’ll need to pace yourself for a full day on the slopes. As a Canadian Ski Patroller, I’m on shift all day and break the day into parts: a few hours of skiing and then take a break. Back out again for a few more hours then take a lunch break. After lunch, I’m back out again with a break in the afternoon. Don’t over do it and your last run will be as good as your first run.

6. Avoid borrowing your Dad’s old equipment

2 skiers taking a break from skiing
Photo by julie aagaard on Pexels.com

Chances are your Dad’s equipment is old, worn out and/or doesn’t fit. Take a pass. If you don’t have your own equipment, rent from a ski shop where they will provide decent equipment based on your skill level. Boots need to be comfortable. Bindings should be set so that they will release your skis when needed. Tuned up skis make it easier to hold an edge and get down the hill. Helmets are very much in style and should be mandatory for their obvious protection. A helmet can’t prevent a concussion, but it could reduce the severity of one. Use quality equipment that fits you and your level of ability.

7. Not Layering Up

I’ve become a bit of an expert at dressing for winter. Wearing the wrong type of clothes can result in a not-so-happy ski day. For example, don’t wear cotton socks and a cotton shirt as your base layer. You will not be warm. The best way to layer up for skiing is to have three high-quality layers: a thin base layer (long johns); an insulating mid-layer (fleece or ski sweater) and then ski pants/ski jacket. Keep active, take rest breaks and keep nourished (your body stays warmer with fuel intake). If your clothes get wet, change them.

Get ready for a great day on the slopes! If you are going on a ski vacation, check out my TuGo post – What to Pack for a Ski or Snowboard Trip. And don’t forget your travel insurance if you travel outside your home province or Canada. Have fun, stay safe and enjoy the great outdoors!