The Best Hiking Trails in Victoria, Australia

The Best Hiking Trails in Victoria, Australia

Australia is more than Melbourne or Sydney. This distant continent offers so much more. One such place is Victoria, the second smallest state, whose wilderness and nature is mesmerizing. Thousands of people all around the world opt to visit it during the year. And if you want to experience it in the right way and you’re up for a challenge, then hiking through some of its most spectacular sights is a perfect way to do so. There are plenty of things to see and many trails that are perfect for all lovers of hiking, but we present you the three most important ones. Look at this guide as we try to convince you which hiking trails to check off your bucket list, starting from the longest to the shortest:

1. Wilsons Promontory – 54 km

The Best Hiking Trails in Victoria, Australia

Just 157 km away from Melbourne lies the Wilsons Promontory National Park, one of the most beautiful national parks in Australia. Also referred to as Wilson Prom or The Prom, this place is heaven to all nature lovers. Not only does this place offer rainforests and magnificent beaches, but it’s also very rich in indigenous history. There is proof that Indigenous Australians lived here more than 6500 years ago. The most important thing that you need to see is the memorial at Tidal River – a memorial to all the commandos who lost their lives during World War II. The memorial weaves its way from the slopes of Mount Oberon down to the Sealers Cove, then south above the waters of Bass Strait and finishes with a photogenic lighthouse that has been operating since 1859. Since this is quite a long hiking trail, you will need much time and plenty of battery on your smartphone as you will want to record everything or photograph every single step – yes, it’s so beautiful.

2. The Viking Circuit – 41 km

Perhaps the most challenging hiking trail of Australia, but then again one of its most beautiful ones, is the Viking Circuit, which is just one small part of the amazing Alpine National Park. What makes this trail so interesting and unusual is that it’s not suitable for inexperienced hikers. If you want to check this out, you need to be well-equipped and experienced in navigation. Take a big reusable water bottle with you as you will definitely need it to rehydrate while you try to find your way through this amazing trail. There are no signposts or walking track markers, but you will see untouched wilderness. If you opt for this trail, you will be witnessing some of Australia’s most beautiful alpine landscapes, mountain peaks and grassy plains, especially through parts of Victoria, New South Wales and ACT. The Viking Circuit is not an easy endeavor with inviting features such as Horrible gap, Mount Despair or the Crosscut Saw. So, if you’re an experienced hiker and want something new and challenging, this 41km-long trail is the perfect choice for you!

The Best Hiking Trails in Victoria, Australia

3. Werribee Gorge Scenic Rim – 14 km

Since the first two choices were longer hiking trails, here’s an option for everyone who wants to embark on a journey but cannot hike long distances. The Werribee Gorge Scenic Rim is perfect as it covers around 14 kilometers. It’s quite a short hike – just a couple of hours long. It is placed in the Werribee Gorge State Park in Victoria and is just an hour drive from Melbourne. This trail is not only popular with hikers all around the world because of the magnificent nature, but because of its diverse geological features – it’s one of the world’s oldest glacial deposits. The gorge was created about a million years ago and hiking here you experience what it’s like to walk on the former ice sheet and volcanic lava. The Werribee Gorge Scenic Rim also showcases examples of perfect nature, scenic viewpoints and even unexplored territory. This is one of Australia’s most cherished treasures

The Best Hiking Trails in Victoria, Australia

Even though there are many more hiking trails that Victoria and Australia have to offer, if you’re an experienced hiker who’s looking for new challenges, one of these should be your next destination. Australia’s perfect and almost intact nature combined with great hiking trails is certainly something that you want to experience in your lifetime.

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Tails and Trails: 5 Dog-friendly Walking Routes in the Lake District

The Lake District, England’s largest national park and home to forests, lakes and rolling hills that soar into mountains. It is a region with something for every one of its 16.4 million annual visitors and for those with dogs and a love of stunning scenery it can be unforgettable.

It is important to realise though, that some of our four-legged friends might be more suited to some places than others. With that in mind, Craig Manor have uncovered the best Lake District walking routes for your dog breed.

Labrador

Labradors need a healthy amount of exercise and, can suffer from weight and joint problems. Derwentwater can be Labrador heaven. The ten mile walk around the lake is long but also has plenty of opportunities for rest, exploring and even taking the boat back to your starting point should the weather turn or older paws start to get tired.

Lake District Dog Walk

 

Jack Russell

Known for their feisty intelligence and with energy to burn, these dogs love time off-lead to bound around and explore, but those energy reserves are finite and shorter routes are a good idea. Tarn Hows at Coniston is a walk that takes in the very best views that The Lake District has to offer over a mile and a half route that takes less than an hour to explore.

Lake District Dog Walk

Staffordshire Bull Terrier

An affectionate companion, with a quiet and trustworthy nature, a ‘Staffie’ loves to explore and varied terrain will offer mental, as well as physical exercise. The Heavy Sides Trail at Whinlatter is a 1.5 mile circular route but can take as long as 90 minutes to explore due to the varied terrain.

Lake District Dog Walk

Border Collie

Loyal, obedient and a breed that thrives on mental stimulation and complex training, the Border Collie was born to explore the lakes at your side. The Silurian way at Grizedale is a ten mile route through forested lands that offers varied terrain, natural beauty and even sculpture installations.

Lake District Dog Walk

Dachshund

Determined and head strong, a Dachshund can be as playful as it can be stubborn, but they can be prone to spinal problems and exploring is best done on flat even terrain. The Allen Bank Woodland walk offers a gentler 2.5 mile walk along the River Allen and takes around an hour passing ancient woodland and beautiful views, perfect for smaller legs.

Lake District Dog Walk

Uncover the wagtastic Lake District dog walks in more detail.

Visiting 4 of British Columbia’s Most Stunning Natural Wonders

According to Destination British Columbia, Canada’s westernmost province includes six tourism regions: Vancouver Island, Vancouver Coast and Mountains, Northern British Columbia, Thompson Okanagan, the Cariboo Chilcotin Coast and the Kootenay Rockies. There are so many natural wonders among them, it would be difficult to experience them all in one trip, but RV travel can make it easier, while making it more affordable too.

You may want to start by researching RV rental in Vancouver. B.C.’s largest city is an ideal spot for kicking off your adventure exploring its many stunning natural wonders, perfectly situated along the west coast of the province.

Whistler and Blackcomb Mountains, Whistler

You might be familiar with Whistler as the spot that co-hosted the Winter Olympics with Vancouver back in 2010. Just 90 minutes from the city, the area is home to Whistler and Blackcomb mountains which are linked by one of the town’s most popular attractions: the PEAK 2 PEAK gondola. As you ride the glass-bottomed gondola which soars a mile over Fitzsimmons Creek you may spot bears roaming the breathtaking landscape below.

British Columbia

Pacific Rim National Park, Vancouver Island

Vancouver Island can be reached via a scenic drive- or walk-on ferry ride from Vancouver. Once there, you can experience one of B.C.’s true natural wonders. Pacific Rim National Park is made up of three units: Long Beach, the West Coast Trail and the Broken Group Islands. It includes everything from unspoiled beaches and rocky shoreline to old-growth coastal rainforest and abundant wildlife, including bald eagles, bears, harbor seals, a variety of whale species and more. Surf, hike, kayak, soak in hot springs, embark on boat excursions or just enjoy quiet contemplation among some of the world’s most impressive and lush scenery.

Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve

The Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve, or Gwaii Haanas as it’s often called, is a remote collection of nearly 140 islands that offer the ultimate wilderness experience that includes rare animals that can’t be spotted anywhere else, including the Haidi Gawaii black bear. The surrounding waters are filled with marine life like whales, dolphins, seals and sea lion, while tufted and horned puffins, peregrine falcons and bald eagles soar through the skies. Join a guided kayak excursion and you can paddle around sea coves, tiny islands and hidden coves while watching the wildlife.

British Columbia

Yoho National Park

This park is rather aptly named for a Cree expression of “awe and wonder.” Nestled in the western slopes of the Rockies, it’s the ultimate outdoor adventurers’ paradise, with everything from magnificent waterfalls like the 100-foot-high and 500-foot-wide Wapta Falls to sparkling lakes, massive glaciers and jagged mountain peaks. The Burgess Shale fossil beds can be found here as well – these incredibly detailed fossils of prehistoric marine life are a half-billion years old providing a fascinating look at the Earth’s ancient past.