County Donegal, Ireland Road Trip Route

Many travellers will fly into Dublin and start their Ireland Road Trip from there. Driving from Dublin to County Donegal is literally driving across Ireland. Here’s some things to remember from a traveller who has driven in Ireland. Irish roads are narrow and often wet from rain. You are driving on the left side of the road and driving from the right front seat. There is a bit of a learning curve for most. You’ll need a GPS to not get lost, find small roads and maneuver through roundabouts. But Ireland and Donegal is well worth the trip!

County Donegal is remote even by Irish standards. There are parts of Donegal that are further north than Northern Ireland, as the Inoshowen Peninsula juts out into the Atlantic. A journey across Donegal with a car rental in Ireland and into Northern Ireland is one of the most serene and idyllic Ireland road trips you can take.

A good starting point for your journey is the Slieve League. These are the tallest sea cliffs in the country, as they stand marginally higher than their more famous brethren; the Cliffs of Moher. These cliffs, however, are not overrun by tourists due to their remote location and the lack of traffic makes any time of year a good time to visit Ireland and journey to this iconic destination. From the Slieve League, head north to the village of Glencolumbkille. This gorgeous village was settled over five thousand years ago, with remains of the original inhabitants that can still be seen in the stone tombs they left behind. Irish is still spoken here by most people.

COUNTY DONEGAL, IRELAND ROAD TRIP ROUTE

Glengesh From Glencolumbkille, head west from the coast and into Glengesh Pass. This pass was formed by glaciers, with the road through it following a path between dramatic green peaks. Glengesh Pass delivers you into the village of Ardara. Ardara plays host to several festivals throughout the year and is in close proximity to the Kilclooney dolmen. A dolmen is a megalithic tomb and the Kilclooney dolmen is one of the most impressive in Europe.Next, head southwest to the small village of Pettigoe. Pettigoe sits just south of Lough Derg. Lough Derg is a small lake and is notable for the island it holds. Station Island is a famous pilgrimage site as it is the home of St. Patrick’s Purgatory, the monastery where St. Patrick was said to have done penance.

COUNTY DONEGAL, IRELAND ROAD TRIP ROUTE

After visiting the monastery, cross the border into Northern Ireland and head north to Derry. Derry is the second largest city in Northern Ireland and offers a good opportunity to reconnect with civilization before you get on the road again. The road west from Derry will take you to Ballycastle. The coastline in and around Ballycastle was given the designation of ‘An Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty‘ by the government group Natural England and is the perfect place to finish your adventure. At this point, you will have journeyed over 150 miles and seen some of the very best Ireland has to offer.

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Best Museums in Amsterdam

Amsterdam Museums

Amsterdam is known for many things, but one thing you may not think of when dreaming of this Dutch city is Museums. Few people realize that Amsterdam is actually home to over 50 museums, many of which are very interesting and thought provoking. Some of them are strange. Here is a list of some of the interesting ones you might want to check out the next time (or first time) you travel to Amsterdam.


BEST MUSEUMS IN AMSTERDAM

Het Grachtenhuis Museum
This is a special museum located on one of the most beautiful and upmarket Herengracht canal. It explores the history of the canal district (a world heritage site) with 3D animation, models, projections and an interactive multimedia exhibition. A very modern look at Amsterdam’s history and a great way to start to your visit.

Tulip Museum
The tulip is often used as a symbol of the Netherlands, so this museum is quite popular with locals and tourists alike. If you love botany, history, or tulips in general, this is the museum for you.

Anne Frank House
The hiding place where Anne Frank wrote her famous diary during World War II is now a museum and is one of the biggest attractions in Amsterdam. See how hard it was and view the original diary on display while at this location. Book a rental car at Schiphol Airport and take the 20 minute drive to the historic museum. This is a must do but get there early because the lines can be long.

Amsterdam Museums - The Anne Frank House

NEMO Science Museum
A hands on museum, NEMO is very popular among children. Science and technology are the themes here, so it’s a must visit if you’re with kids on vacation. Get a Museumkaart or I Amsterdam City Card for free admission. Ask about discounted group rates!

Torture Museum
This place brings out the macabre in everyone. View a collection and learn about some of the oldest cruelest torture methods of the past. Thankfully most of these methods are no longer in use. The fact that most of what’s on display are actual artifacts is particularly disturbing.

Museum of Bags and Purses 
To me, being surrounded by this many handbags and purses seems like a scene from the previous museum!

National Maritime Museum
The museum is dedicated to maritime history and contains many artefacts associated with shipping and sailing. The collection contains, paintings, scale models, weapons and world maps. Moored directly outside the museum is a replica of the Amsterdam, an 18th-century ship which sailed between the Netherlands and the East Indies.

Van Gogh Museum
One of the most popular tourist attractions in Amsterdam, explore the world’s largest collection of Van Gogh work. A must-see for any traveling virtuoso, see his work and learn about his life story. You won’t be disappointed!

The Rijksmuseum
This is the Dutch national museum dedicated to arts and history in Amsterdam. It showcases national treasurers and artifacts from over 800 years of Dutch history. The museum is located at the Museum Square in the borough Amsterdam South, close to the Van Gogh Museum. Again, a must visit!

There are of course more museums, including the Museum of The Canals, the Costume Museum, the Heineken Experience, the Houseboat Museum and more. They make for an interesting day and a way to quickly immerse yourself in Dutch culture and history.

Can you think of any interesting or strange museums that are in Amsterdam?

The Ultimate Guide to Experiencing the Caribbean Like a Local

Your bags are packed, you are ready to go, all that is left is to make the final touches on your Caribbean itinerary. Except, if you want to really understand the culture of the Caribbean, it is best to forget strict timings, take off your shoes, and just go with the flow.

For more ways to make the most of your trip, read on for the ultimate guide to experiencing the Caribbean like a local.

1. Know how to stick to a budget.

Locals in all places tend to know the tips and tricks essential to living on a budget day-in and day-out. If you really want to experience this region like a local, then it is critical to overlook the tourist traps and those things deemed “must-sees” and instead open yourself up to getting into the local groove.

To visit when there is the least amount of tourists, opt to travel during the off-season (during the North American fall and winter), as you will not only be able to bypass hoards of tourists, but you will also be able to save up to 30% on the costs of your accommodation.

Additionally, one of the best ways to keep your costs down and to get some exercise (see #2) is to choose to walk around your locale as much as possible. After all, the weather is so perfect, you may as well take advantage of it as much as possible!

When walking around a new destination, you are able to witness and appreciate the slower, more authentic moments of the local’s life, and you are more likely to find yourself facing opportunities to speak with new friends. Those from the Caribbean are known for being friendly and hospitable, and they regard the broader community in the same way they do their family, so put on your walking shoes and get out there.

2. Ensure you stay healthy.

For many people, traveling to a foreign destination means forgetting all about health and wellness; however, if you want to stay healthy while in the Caribbean, it is indeed possible. Your first step is merely to believe that you can do it and to create a plan in advance so that you are prepared upon arrival.

Luckily, the Caribbean is usually considered a healthy environment with an abundance of clean water which means the “tropical diseases” that many other places experience aren’t a problem for those who visit these islands. However, it is always recommended to stay up-to-date on any travel warnings and health recommendations.

In addition to walking as much as possible, do like the locals do and make swimming a daily activity. Whether it is in your hotel pool or in the sea (it does have an 83-degree year-round water temperature!) getting in some laps surely won’t feel like a chore in the Caribbean.

In fact, it is hard for anything to feel like a chore when you are in a place that has such a fantastic work-life balance. This is one of the main reasons that foreigners are interested in second citizenship programs to the Caribbean and consider securing Antigua citizenship by investment or a second passport in St. Kitts, for example.

3. Always opt for the local food and drink.

 

When it comes to really living the local life in the Caribbean (or wherever you are traveling), the key is to always opt for the local food and drink. Not only is Caribbean cuisine delicious, but it will also be the most cost-effective way to eat. By consuming the local specialties, you will get a deeper insight into the country and its people.

So, what should you be eating and drinking?

While all the countries in the Caribbean have their own variations of dishes, you can be assured that fish is one of the most important staples for everyone in the region. Due to the proximity to the ocean, Caribbean cuisine is known for its usage of fresh fish, conch, and other seafood.

Additionally, other local specialities include jerk chicken, roast pork with rice and beans, pepperpot (a rich and thick stew), and goat stew. Whatever dish you opt for, you can guarantee that it is going to include a lot of spices. Throughout the Caribbean, you will notice small roadside cantinas which offer home-style dishes — make sure to indulge in at least one meal here. And don’t forget to try the rum!

Have you ever traveled to the Caribbean? What do you do to ensure you are able to live more of a local life when traveling? Let us know your tips and tricks in the comments below!

 

 

AUTHOR BIO
Kal Kennard is a Partner at Citizens International, a white-glove specialist firm offering private client services necessary for citizenship investment into the Caribbean. Based in the Caribbean for the past 15 years, she is an experienced consultant who works directly with many professional partners and advises clients worldwide.