Where You Should Travel for a Really Good Cup of Coffee

Travel for Coffee

Nowadays, coffee has become a part of our modern lifestyle. Whether you drink it in the morning to help you freshen up or in the afternoon while socializing with your friends, you too probably have your favorite type of coffee. After all, with so many different types and ways to brew it, finding a good cup of coffee is not that difficult. However, if you’d like to taste the best coffee in the world, here’s where you should travel.

Italy

If you love coffee, you should visit Italy, especially if you’re a fan of espresso. However, the Italians don’t drink coffee in the same way as the rest of the world, so there are a few things you should know about ordering coffee in Italy. For example, if you love cappuccino, make sure to order it before 11 a.m. since some cafés refuse to serve it later due to the milk in it.

Travel for Coffee

Colombia

Thanks to the variety of microclimates in Columbia, coffee is successfully produced all year round. If you want, you can witness the process of making it as well. The Columbian countryside is filled with winding roads, and some of the plantations are not so easy to reach. So, if you like adventures, you would surely enjoy Colombia.

Jamaica

Jamaican’s Blue Mountain Coffee is one of the most sought-after coffees in the world, which is why it’s very expensive. It is known for having a mild flavor and not being bitter, and grows at around 2000 feet above the sea level. The soil on Blue Mountain is rich, and with lots of rain, makes the climate perfect for growing coffee.

Travel for Coffee

Australia

If you’re looking for something a bit different, you should travel to the Land Down Under. Australians have many different methods of preparing coffee, and you can try most of them in the comfort of your own home. They also have some amazing specialized coffee pods if the regular Nespresso pods can’t satisfy your needs.

Costa Rica

Coffee became popular in Costa Rica during the late 1700s, and it’s been important for the country’s economy ever since. There is a movement in Costa Rica to grow organic coffee, so it’s safe to say that Costa Ricans prefer their coffee to be not just delicious but of high quality as well.

Travel for Coffee

Cuba

Cubans are known for preparing strong coffee, so if you’re looking for a good kick, try their coffee. It is usually very sweet but extremely powerful. Cubans guarantee that once you get used to the taste, you won’t be able to get enough of it. Just make sure not to drink it as quickly as you would your usual coffee; you don’t want to underestimate its strength.

Ethiopia

If you consider yourself a coffee lover, you should visit its birthplace. Ethiopia is one of the world’s top producers of coffee, and it’s an important part of its culture. Each regions’ coffee tastes a bit different but equally delicious. Here, you can also be a part of a special coffee ceremony that can last for hours and taste coffee like no other in the world.

Travel for Coffee

Hawaii

When thinking of Hawaii, most people imagine hot sandy beaches and cold cocktails. However, Hawaii is also home to amazing coffee. Thanks to the volcanic soil, tropical climate, and dedication of the inhabitants, the coffee here is truly of very high quality. There are even guided tours that show you how it is made. So, if you don’t know where to spend your next vacation, Hawaii should be on your list.

You can’t call yourself a true coffee lover if you’ve only tasted one type of coffee. After all, coffee is no longer just a drink; it has become an integral part of our culture. So, don’t stop at one cup – pack your bags, immerse yourself in different cultures, and experience some of the finest cups of coffee in the world.

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How to Visit Cuba on a Budget

The post below was originally published on Hipmunk’s Tailwind Blog on April 12, 2016 by The Hipmunk.

Editor’s note: As of Aug 31, 2016, direct flights from the US to Cuba are taking off for the first time since 1961.

Now that Cuba’s tourism industry is up and running, we’re doing everything we can to educate our readers about how to make the most of their Cuban vacations. From knowing which cities to visit to learning how the country has changed and prepping for your trip, we’ve got you covered.

If you’re ready to visit but worried about finances, we’ve still got your back. Simply implement the following strategies in order to enjoy a budget-friendly trip to Cuba.

It helps to know Spanish.

Overwhelmingly, travelers to Cuba report that you’ll be more accepted if you speak Spanish—and that means you’re more likely to be offered lower prices and to haggle successfully. Even if you don’t have time to become fluent before your visit, learning a few key Spanish phrases will surely make the trip a little easier.

Don’t withdraw or exchange cash in Cuba.

Cuba currently uses two types of currency: the CUC, which is designated primarily for tourists, and the CUP (the peso national), which is civilians’ primary currency. (The government has announced plans to eliminate the dual currency system, but has yet to do so.) For the most part, tourists will be dealing in CUCs, but budget-friendly travelers may want to keep a few CUPs on hand (more on that later). In either case, it’s smart to exchange your money before arriving in Cuba—otherwise you’ll incur a10% penalty to exchange dollars to CUCs. Similarly, avoid using credit cards whenever possible, as fees are quite steep.

Plan for exit and entry.

You’ll be charged $25 CUC to enter Cuba, and another $25 CUC when you fly out of the airport. Go ahead and set aside $50 CUC before your trip so you aren’t caught by surprise on the way in or out of the country. While you’re at it, set aside another $20-$25 CUC for the taxi ride from the airport.

Take advantage of cheap eats.

Want to save money on food? Then seek out local establishments that operate on pesos (namely, street food vendors and peso restaurants). This can be a serious money saver—think the difference between paying $0.80 or $8.00 for a sandwich. If you’re staying in a casa particular (aka a private homestay), this is also a good place to eat cheaply—meals tend to be huge (meaning you can split one dish between two people) and less expensive than meals at touristy restaurants. Or hit up hotel buffets for a meal that will fill you up for around $8 CUC.

Pack your own snacks and toiletries.

Basic toiletries and medical supplies—think sunscreen, Aspirin, and contact lens solution—are either very expensive or totally unavailable in Cuba, so don’t assume that you can pick up supplies once you’ve arrived. Instead, bring along any toiletries that you can’t go without. Same goes for your favorite snack foods.

Get mobile like a local.

Cuba has designated tourist buses, and (not surprisingly) they can  be a bit of a money trap. You’ll save on transportation by taking public buses, camiones (i.e open-backed trucks), or shared taxis. As an added bonus, local transportation tends to operate on a more flexible timetable than the tourist buses.

Entertain thyself.

Cuba has a vibrant nightlife scene, and you can drink for change if you stick to local establishments. (A good rule of thumb: Avoid any club that charges an entrance fee.) If you’re not sure where to go, ask your casa hosts or local street vendors for suggestions. If the club scene isn’t your thing, you can still find cheap entertainment in the form of museums, which typically charge only $1-2 CUC for entry. Just be aware that many museums charge an additional fee for anyone who wants to take photos.

While Cuba may not be the cheapest destination around, there are plenty of deals to be had for the frugal traveler. Just remember: When in doubt, act like a local.