Dealing with Common Travel Emergencies

Dealing with Common Travel Emergencies (2)

The majority of trips and overseas vacations go without any significant issues. But even the best plans and carefully designed schedules can turn into a stress-fueled disaster and completely ruin your vacation. Whether it’s a missed flight, stolen documents or misplaced credit card, travel emergencies happen more often than you think and unless you adequately prepare for them, your trip overseas can easily be replaced with a disappointing ride home. Here are some common travel emergencies people experience, as well as a couple of ways to deal with them and avoid them in the first place.

Missed or canceled flight

Missed or canceled flight

Some of the most common reasons travelers end up missing their flight includes oversleeping, arriving at the gate far too late, long security lines and late connections. Although most of these can easily be avoided by being more responsible with your scheduling and arriving at the airport a little bit earlier than usual, flight connections tend to be the weakest point of an otherwise carefully planned travel schedule. Booking a connecting flight might be cheaper, especially when you’re working with a limited budget, but spending a couple of extra bucks on a direct flight is ultimately a better idea. If you absolutely cannot afford a direct flight, then try to have at least a few hours in between the flights.

Road trip emergencies

Road trip emergencies

While you might prefer catching a quick flight to your dream destination, there are those who prefer taking the road and turning their trip into a proper adventure. The only issue is that all it takes is a small mechanical failure or a moment of carelessness to completely ruin your trip. Make sure to check your car for any issues and inspect everything from the tire pressure to your windscreen wipers. Another common issue people report experiencing is getting their keys locked inside their car. If you happen to find yourself in such a scenario while traveling through the greater Sydney area, there’s a professional locksmith in East Ryde on call ready to provide you with assistance regardless of the time of the day.

Lost or stolen documents

Lost or stolen documents

Losing your documents while traveling domestically is very stressful, let alone losing them in a completely foreign country. If you happen to experience losing your passport or ID or having them stolen alongside your wallet and belongings, contact the local police and file a claim with your travel insurance agency. Losing your papers in a foreign country, however, requires traveling to a consulate or the embassy and dealing with issuing fees and filling out paperwork. Scan every important document you have with your smartphone before traveling or print out copies and give them to a person you trust in case you also lose your phone or laptop.

Lost or stolen money

Lost or stolen money

Carrying all the credit cards and money you have in a single wallet is a sure-proof recipe for disaster. While cash is often misplaced or simply stolen, credit cards can also get stuck in an ATM or simply be denied for one reason or the other. This is why it’s important to have more than one financial resource available at all times. Make sure you always have small amounts of cash on you for regular purchases and a debit or an ATM card in case you run out of money, but always have a spare card just in case and split your resources between your different bags and belongings.

No matter what type of emergency you experience, whether it’s losing your ID and passport, getting stuck in a middle of nowhere in the middle of your road trip or you find yourself in a middle of a crisis situation, the single most important thing is to remain calm and collected. Avoid lashing out at the people around you and be patient. The majority of stressful situations can be avoided with careful planning ahead so try to prepare as best as you can, keep your cool and try to find a silver lining while you wait for your situation to get resolved.

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How to Make the Most of Your Long Australian Vacation

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Have you decided to take the plunge and go on a long vacation in a faraway country like Australia? Well, that’s excellent considering Australia is one of the most gorgeous countries in the world. And while most tourists will say that it’s simply too far away, it’s definitely worth the time, cost and the long flights. However, if you’re considering going to Australia for a vacation you need to make a serious plan for this kind of vacation seeing as it’s simply impossible to see all there is to see in a week. Two weeks is the least you should spend traveling across Australia and even then, good organization is the key. Read on to learn some tips on how to make the most on this trip of a lifetime you’re going to spend in this beautiful country.

How to plan a longer trip

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The first thing you need to take into consideration once you start planning your nice long vacation in Australia is the fact that the country is huge. This means that it’s basically impossible to see the whole country by simply driving from one end of the country to the other. A better way to spend your vacation in Australia is to focus on one type of vacation. So instead of lots of packing and unpacking, spending too much time on airports, bus terminals and long road trips simply decide whether you prefer an adventurous trip, a beach vacation, or maybe something else completely. While it’s difficult to accept the fact that you won’t be able to see everything there is to see, with the time constraint and taking into consideration that this kind of a trip cannot be cheap, it’s definitely better to start planning your trip with some focus in mind.

Places to visit

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As already mentioned, there are plenty of places to visit in Australia and this is why it’s important to prioritize the things you really want to see. If you don’t like going to the beach, skip Bondi beach in Sydney and visit all the museums you’re interested in. Before you start planning your trip, think about your vacation preferences- if you enjoy finding a good place to relax or you are more interested in parties; if you want to visit historical sites or  you prefer adventurous vacations; if you would like to see the cities or maybe the coastal or outback areas or you just want to enjoy Australian food and wine. By defining what you want to see, it’ll be easier to plan your trip and make the most of it by doing the things you enjoy.

Types of travel experiences

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When it comes to vacationing in Australia, there is something for everyone so all you need to do is take your pick. From busy, vibrant cities, quaint and cute small towns, superb wine regions, to amazingly beautiful ancient rainforests, enchanting mountains, amazing reefs, gorgeous beaches, vast deserts and stunningly unique wildlife. One thing is for sure; you’ll never be bored in Australia.

Think about flights and accommodation

Once again, organization is the key to having a full experience once on a vacation. Some of the things you need to pay attention to are accommodation and how you’re going to get to Australia. It’s best to choose the destinations which are the closest to your origin in order to save time and not spend too much of it on commuting. Another important thing to think about is accommodation. If you’re staying longer, and you should stay as long as possible, avoid hotels and hostels as this is costly. Something that you should take into consideration is renting a place while you’re on your vacation. One of the frequently asked questions by travelers is “Can you pay rent with a credit card?” and not only is the answer YES but you might even get rewarded for it by earning points which you can use for flights or vouchers. So renting a place for yourself can be practical both money-wise and organization-wise.

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Stop looking at the pictures of Australia; instead, book those plane tickets, start planning and packing and go on the vacation you’ll probably ever have in your life.

Why should you go on a Pilgrimage

This guest post was written by Rebecca Brown, an avid traveller from Ireland.

 

Do people even go on pilgrimages today? Really? In the age of the Internet and all that?

Odds are, we are further from God (if there is a God) than we have ever been. And I’m not trying to belittle your belief system, I have one of my own too. However, I never imagined myself as the kind of person to go on an actual pilgrimage. In the sense that I will be walking the same road hundreds of thousands of people have walked since the Middle Ages, a road where people died, and which they traversed to feel closer to their deity. Turns out, it was one of the best experiences of my life.

Admittedly, before we took the trip last year, I visited my mother’s homeland (she was born in Eastern Europe). Seeing where she came from felt like a spiritual homecoming, and that’s putting it mildly and overemphasizing it at the same time. When my husband suggested the Camino de Santiago, I was on the fence to say the least. However, he talked me into it, and the five weeks we spent walking across France and Spain were some of the best of our lives. That’s where the inspiration for this piece has come from, and all the people whose faces I am not likely to forget, but who will remain anonymous in the next page or two.

In a nutshell, here is why you should be going on a pilgrimage:

You are either rather young, or rather old

I know it sounds idiotic, but it’s true – we’ve met many young people out looking for adventure. They were in it for the walk, for the miles, for the nights of camping, for getting soaked in the middle of nowhere and chasing after a bus, (knowing that riding it is not the true Camino way, but nevertheless caring more about being dry than a true pilgrim). Not all were believers, and not all wanted to come, but I met one of them at Santiago de Compostela, who said it was the best vacation of her life.

On the other hand, we met an older gentleman from York. He has been walking a different Camino each year for five years. He told me he needed the time to spend in his own head, and that nothing can get your brain working like moving your legs. He’d been a top level executive for ten years, and now that he was one no longer, he wanted the time and the space to reflect on those years, the failures and the big wins. No better way to see yourself more clearly than to walk five hundred miles, he said. I’m thinking he’s probably right.

You (don’t) believe in God

Of course, there are those who take pilgrimages to feel closer to God, even today. There are also those who don’t quite believe, but would like to. The devout are some of the most interesting people to talk to on the Camino – they are calm, collected, and they can absolutely motivate you when you are about to chuck your shoes in the ditch and fly home. There are amazing heartfelt conversations to be had while you walk along. You may often find yourself questioning your own views of the world, and I don’t just mean your spiritual beliefs.

You want a challenge

This is admittedly me. I wanted to challenge myself physically and mentally – and see if I could do it. Turns out I can, even if I did want to quit three times. Let me warn you, there will be blisters. There will be rain and wind. There will be annoying people bugging you, but you can’t avoid them anyway. But you will have time to think, you will have time to breathe (I can’t stress this enough) and you will have the incentive to open your heart just a bit more. By the way, I am a terrible cynic in my everyday life, but something about the Camino has changed me. I have not only traveled from Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port to Santiago de Compostela, I have learned more about life and people in those 800 kilometers than I thought I could.

If this short rant has sold the Camino the Santiago to you as well, here are some of my expert tips:

  • Choose a reliable tour operator. We went with Follow the Camino, based on a recommendation, and we were never once sorry.
  • Choose even more reliable shoes. I finally bought these Hanwag Trek Light ones, and they were great – after I paired them with the right socks.
  • Choose the most reliable socks. The socks are the most important part of your gear, don’t underestimate them for a second.
  • Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate. Upping your water intake will help you feel and walk better, no question about it.
  • Leave the prejudice behind. Simply enjoy the walk and the air and the company. That’s what you’re there for.

Have you ever walked the Camino de Santiago? Would you like to, and if yes, what are your reasons? If these eight hundred plus words have not sold you the idea of trekking eight hundred kilometers, let me know why you are still unconvinced!